Neo-Renaissance Cupboard Beech Italy XIX Century

Italy Late 19th century

Code :  ANMOST0163088

not available
Neo-Renaissance Cupboard Beech Italy XIX Century

Italy Late 19th century

Code :  ANMOST0163088

not available

Neo-Renaissance Cupboard Beech Italy XIX Century - Italy Late 19th century

Features

Italy Late 19th century

Style:  Neo-Renaissance (1820-1890)

Age:  XIX Century - from 1801 to 1900

Origin:  Italia

Main essence:  Swiss pine Beech tree

Material:  Carved Wood

Description

Neo-Renaissance cupboard in beech and pine, richly carved, Italy late 19th century. Riser decorated with a pair of all-round lateral griffins and panels with cherubs in festive and rural attitudes, a pair of drawers in the band, 2 carved paneled doors framed within 3 telamon pilasters placed on the front. Carved cantilever feet portraying masks.

Product Condition:
Product that due to age and wear may require restoration and resumption of polishing.

Dimensions (cm):
Height: 134
Width: 161,5
Depth: 62

Additional Information

Style: Neo-Renaissance (1820-1890)

Nineteenth-century recovery and re-evaluation of forms and styles typical of the Renaissance.
Find out more with the insights of our blog:
Classic Monday: a neo-Renaissance sideboard in dialogue with the past
The dictionary of antiques - Savonarola

Age: XIX Century - from 1801 to 1900

Main essence:

Swiss pine

The word Cirmolo originates in the Lombard dialects and indicates the wood produced by the pine, a conifer that grows in the Alps above 1600 meters. It is a reddish wood with peculiar knots. It is a soft wood, used for carvings or rustic furniture or for the lacquered furniture of Venetian furniture makers.

Beech tree

It is a semi-hard wood which, unfortunately, is easily wormed, therefore it is considered poor. Due to its light but variegated shades, from blond to reddish, it was nevertheless appreciated by French cabinetmakers. It was mainly used for furniture structures or, as an alternative to walnut, by provincial English furniture makers for popular works, mostly in the 1700s. The noblest use is due to Thonèt, who applied the steam bending of the beech in the making of the furniture, in particular for the chairs that took his name.

Material: Carved Wood

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