Ancient Corner Cupboard Early '800 Mahogany Maple Doors

England, Early XIX Century

Code :  ANMOAN0201514

not available
Ancient Corner Cupboard Early '800 Mahogany Maple Doors

England, Early XIX Century

Code :  ANMOAN0201514

not available

Ancient Corner Cupboard Early '800 Mahogany Maple Doors - England, Early XIX Century

Features

England, Early XIX Century

Age:  19th Century / 1801-1900

Origin:  England

Main essence:  Maple Mahogany

Description

Hanging corner unit in mahogany with front with two framed doors with larger panels in the upper part and smaller in the lower part threaded and inlaid with small details in maple concealing internal shelves and small drawers on the bottom. Born as a corner cupboard later divided. Missing locks. England early 19th century.

Product Condition:
Product which due to age and wear requires restoration and re-polishing. We try to present the real state of the furniture as fully as possible with photos. If some details are not clear from the photos, what is reported in the description will prevail.

Dimensions (cm):
Height: 109,5
Width: 82
Depth: 51

Additional Information

Age: 19th Century / 1801-1900

Main essence:

Maple

Hard, light wood used for inlays. It grows mainly in Austria, but it is widespread throughout the northern hemisphere, from Japan to North America, passing through China and Europe. It is one of the lightest woods ever, tending to white, it is similar to lime or birch wood. The briar is used in the production of ancient secretaires .

Mahogany

It is one of the most precious and sought-after woods in cabinet making. It was discovered in Central America around 1600 and began to be imported to England in the 1700s. Much appreciated for its hardness and indestructibility, it became widespread following the blocking of walnut exports from France in 1720 and the consequent elimination of English import duties on mahogany from the colonies in America and India. The most valuable version comes from Cuba, but it became very expensive. At the end of the 18th century it began to be used also in France in Louis XVI, Directory and Empire furniture, its diffusion declined starting from when Napoleon, in 1810, forbade its import. It was generally used in the manufacture of elegant furniture, due to its characteristics and beautiful grain.
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