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6 cm 319 cm

12 cm 696 cm

1 cm 180 cm

13 cm 150 cm

35 cm 56 cm
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Portrait Of Eleonora Lampugnani Oil On Canvas Second Half 1500
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ARARPI0097145

Portrait Of Eleonora Lampugnani Oil On Canvas Second Half 1500

ARARPI0097145

Portrait Of Eleonora Lampugnani Oil On Canvas Second Half 1500

Oil on canvas. Lombard school. The rich lady portrayed is accompanied by the identifying inscription at the top right which reads "Eleonora Lampuniana Nupta N.V. Bartolomei De Cornu 1478": it is therefore Eleonora Lampugnani wife of Bartolomeo Del Corno. The Lampugnani family is an ancient patrician family of Milan (the name derives from the Lampugnano neighbourhood), with residences in Legnano and Busto Arsizio, and to which Filippo Maria Visconti (Duke of Milan) assigned the fief of Trecate in the fifteenth century; the noblewoman's husband belonged to the noble Piedmontese Corno family (originally called Del Corno). The noblewoman is portrayed standing, in a splendid richly embroidered dress, embellished with lace; she lays her hand on a precious box inlaid with ivory, probably a coin cabinet, a symbol of wealth and power, surmounted by a vase with flowers, a symbol of vanity. The painting has an ancient restoration on the hands, which are of lower quality than the face, the clothes, the glass jar. The painting comes from an antique Lombard collection. The date 1478, reported in the inscription, is not very consistent with the sixteenth-century clothing: according to the story of the family of origin of the painting, the date that appeared before the last restoration was 1578, and therefore it would be a modification mistakenly made by the restorer.

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Giovanni Baglione, attributed to
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ARARPI0087707

Giovanni Baglione, attributed to

Herodias receives the head of the Baptist

ARARPI0087707

Giovanni Baglione, attributed to

Herodias receives the head of the Baptist

Oil painting on canvas. Inspired by the Gospel accounts of the life of John the Baptist, the scene depicts Queen Herodias receiving the preacher's head on a plate, which her daughter Salomé had requested from Herod in exchange for her dance. Herodias is depicted here in all her royalty, with the crown and the scepter, dressed in clothes and jewels, but with an aloof and indifferent expression, almost bored, even in front of the macabre spectacle, while making the gesture of disdainfully pushing away the trophy that a servant is handing her on a platter. The work, already auctioned by Dorotheum in 2008, was published and well described in the text "Art history studies in honor of Fabrizio Lemme", published in 2017, in the chapter by Michele Nicolaci (historian of expert art of seventeenth-century painting), which presents it as an unpublished painting by Giovanni Baglione. He was a Roman artist and writer, known above all for having written "The lives of painters, sculptors and architects from the pontificate of Gregory XIII of 1572 up to the time of Pope Urban Eighth" in 1642, the first published collection of artist biographies in 17th century Rome. His writing "The nine churches of Rome", published in 1639, is also of considerable importance. His pictorial activity took place between Rome and Naples; initially of a late mannerist style, when he met Caravaggio, he adapted to his style almost reaching imitation, so much so as to arouse the indignation of Merisi and his derision, as well as the scarce consideration of his Roman colleagues; isolated and insulted, Baglione then returned to his own personal style, but he was nevertheless able to achieve good success in Roman high society, thanks also to his ability to gain favor with the powerful and reinvent himself as a man of letters in the Barberini court. His stylistic turning point with the return to a mannerist approach took place around 1630 and was defined in a production characterized by compositional forcing and almost caricatured characters. This Herodias can also be placed in this period: although in the redundant and excessive, almost ironic way of portraying the character, this work does not lack elegance, in the theatrical pose of the woman, but also of the servant, in the skilful game of contrasts. chromatic (in the dress of the queen, but also in the differences between the incarnates), in the overabundance of clothes and jewels. The canvas has been restored and relined. It is presented in a gilded frame from the late 19th century. Publication attached to the painting.

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